Trump Condemns Charlottesville Violence But Doesn’t Single Out White Nationalists

But he kept quiet Saturday morning as a protest led by white nationalists, who arrived with torches and chants in Charlottesville, Friday night, turned violent. The cable networks that he usually watches showed footage of increasingly violent clashes between the white nationalists, some of whom looked like soldiers because they were so heavily armed, and the counterprotesters who showed up to challenge them.

He kept quiet as David Duke, the former leader of the Ku Klux Klan, declared that the scene in Charlottesville is a "turning point" for a movement that aims to "fulfill the promises of Donald Trump."

The president kept quiet as Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe (D) declared a state of emergency - and as Trump's own wife responded, writing in a tweet that "no good comes from violence."

Cable news commentary, Twitter and the inboxes of White House spokesmen quickly filled with this question: Where is the president?

Then, at 1:19 p.m. in New Jersey, Trump took a break from his working vacation at his private golf club to tweet: "We ALL must be united & condemn all that hate stands for. There is no place for this kind of violence in America. Lets come together as one!"

Trump has long tiptoed around the issue of white supremacy and has yet to provide a full-throttled rebuke of those who invoke his name. He had to be repeatedly pushed to denounce Duke after the former KKK leader endorsed him and praised him.

Trump's candidacy excited many white nationalists, who were thrilled to hear Trump mock the Black Lives Matter movement on the campaign trail and declare that "all lives matter." They rallied behind his promises to build a wall on the southern border, reduce the number of foreigners allowed into the country and pressure everyone in the country to speak English and say "Merry Christmas." And they celebrated Trump selecting Stephen Bannon as his chief strategist, who formerly ran the right-wing Breitbart News and advocated for what he calls the "alt-right" movement.

About two hours after the president's tweet, Trump expanded with a four-minute statement that began: "We condemn in the strongest possible terms this egregious display of hatred, bigotry and violence on many sides." He then added for emphasis: "On many sides."

When asked what the president meant by "on many sides," a White House spokesperson responded: "The President was condemning hatred, bigotry and violence from all sources and all sides. There was violence between protesters and counter protesters today." When pressed on what exactly the president saw or heard from the counter-protesters that was bigoted or hateful, the spokesman did not respond. Later in the evening, Trump praised law enforcement officers at the protest and offered his condolences to a victim.

Trump never used the words "white supremacy" or "white nationalism." He didn't detail what acts or words he considers to be hateful or bigoted. He didn't mention the vehicle that had driven into a crowd of counter-protesters in Charlottesville - a tactic that has been repeatedly used by Islamic State terrorists. He scolded both sides and treated their offenses as being equal. He was vague enough that his statement could be interpreted in a number of different ways.

"Did Trump just denounce antifa?" tweeted Richard Spencer, who helped organize the protest in Charlottesville, using a term short for "anti-fascist" to describe violent liberal protesters.

But many other Americans wanted their president to be crystal-clear when it comes to white supremacy and what they were witnessing in Charlottesville. The president's tweet and statement were quickly questioned and protested.

"There is only one side," tweeted former vice president Joe Biden.

Other Republicans took a completely different approach.

Former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee (R), whose daughter, Sarah Huckabee Sanders, is Trump's press secretary, tweeted: "'White supremacy' crap is worst kind of racism-it's EVIL and perversion of God's truth to ever think our Creator values some above others."

Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., and Sen. Cory Gardner, R-Colo., both urged the president to use the words "white supremacists" and to label this as a terror attack.

And Sen. Orrin Hatch, R-Utah, tweeted: "We should call evil by its name. My brother didn't give his life fighting Hitler for Nazi ideas to go unchallenged here at home."

Source : http://www.brainerddispatch.com/news/4311533-trump-condemns-charlottesville-violence-doesnt-single-out-white-nationalists-blame

Trump condemns Charlottesville violence but doesn't single out white nationalists for blame
Trump condemns Charlottesville violence but doesn’t single out white nationalists for blame