A Month By Month Guide To Accomplishing Your 2017 Financial Goals

Whichever route you choose for creating a will, just make sure you have a witness present and that you sign in front of a notary.

5. May: Assess Your Life Insurance Needs

Life insurance helps ensure that your family will be financially protected if you die. (Full disclosure: Haven Life, the company I work for, sells life insurance.)

If you have loved ones who depend on you for financial support and you don't have a policy outside of work, then you're probably not adequately covered.

Most employer-sponsored life insurance coverage only provides one or two years salary for a death benefit. That may seem like a lot to some, but the recommended amount of coverage is usually five to 10 times your annual income. And it's important to remember that employer-sponsored coverage usually doesn't go where you go, which means coverage usually ends when you get a new job.

Life insurance should help cover:

  • Day-to-day living expenses
  • A mortgage and other debts
  • College costs for children
  • Childcare costs
  • Future healthcare costs
  • Funeral and final expenses
  • Charitable giving
  • Any legacy you want to leave

6. June: Consolidate Your 401K Accounts

Young workers move around and take a lot of jobs. According to the Harvard Business Review, more than 20% of Millennials have job hopped within the last year. But, with all of this moving, what happens to your retirement plans? Many workers simply leave their 401K retirement plans spread across their many former employers. If you've changed jobs recently, March is a good time to turn your attention to consolidating your 401K retirement plans. Roll over the old accounts into your new employer's 401K or a Traditional IRA.

By keeping all of your retirement savings in single place, you'll have better control and more investment options at your disposal. Consolidation will also help you maintain the right asset allocation based on your current risk tolerance.

7. July: Increase Your Retirement Contributions (But Not at Your Budget's Expense)

You can boost your retirement savings without killing your budget if you increase your contribution with every pay raise earned.

If you get a pay raise of 2%, consider increasing your monthly contributions to your 401K or Roth IRA by 1%. It's a sneaky way to trick yourself into saving more for your retirement without feeling the pain. Especially if you can time this increase in retirement savings before you even see the larger paycheck.

8. August: Open a 529 Account

A 529 College Savings Plan is a great tool to help you save for your children's college education. As soon as your newborn receives his or her Social Security number, consider opening a 529.

Parents (and grandparents, aunts, uncles, and other family members) can contribute after-tax dollars to the plan, which typically offers a number of different investment options. Your contributions can grow over time, and earnings are tax-free as long as you use them for qualified higher education expenses when withdrawn. You can also receive a deduction on your state income taxes in many states for 529 contributions.

9. September: September Is for Shredding

Financial statements are like weeds. If left unattended, they can grow, multiply and before you know it, take over your desk completely.

Knowing which financial documents to keep and which to shred is key.

You can shred receipts for items you aren't going to return as soon as the purchase has posted to your account. You can destroy credit card monthly statements after you've received them and reconciled your purchases.

Better yet: Consider switching to digital statements. Start going through your bank, credit card and investment accounts and opt for digital statements instead of paper copies. This way, you'll help save the environment and keep desk clutter to a minimum.

Remember, it's important to keep monthly investment statements until you receive your year-end statement. You should keep year-end statements for at least seven years in case you get audited. The same is also true for all tax documents. You should keep supporting tax documentation for at least seven years.

Shredding your financial documents or having a digital safe haven is one of your best defenses against identity theft.

And, hey, shredding a stack of papers never stops being gratifying.

10. October: Build Your Financial Team

We all need some help in our corner and trusted advisers we can turn to.

A financial team can be a sounding board for ideas and can help you stay on track with your financial goals. You may want to consider working with a financial planner, a tax professional, insurance agent, mortgage broker and/or real estate agent. If your financial life is an enterprise, this is your personal board of directors to assist you.

Get your team in place now and then turn to them throughout the year when you need help with things like filing your taxes, adjusting your investments or even insight on if it's a good time to put your house on the market.

11. November: Stop Giving the Government an Interest-Free Loan

Your goal should be having little-to-no income tax refund each year. Having a small refund means that you're getting the right amount of taxes withheld from your paycheck each month.

A large income tax refund is equivalent to an interest-free loan to the government. According to IRS records, the average income tax refund in America is $3,120. That equals $260 each month that you could add back to your monthly paycheck.

Too many Americans look at an income tax refund as a year-end bonus, but it's an overpayment of your taxes every month. What could you do with an extra $260 each month?

Take some time in November to check in with your HR department about changing your withholding and updating your W2.

12. December: Rebalance Your Investment Portfolios

Many investors do not get a higher rate of return on their investment portfolio because their allocations get out of whack. December is the perfect time to rebalance your investments.

Investors should rebalance once a year to optimize their desired investing mix based on their investing timeframe, objectives and tolerance for risk. Rebalancing helps you stick to your investment plan and avoid potential anxieties as the market fluctuates. Many financial experts recommend rebalancing once a year either during the new year or in the investor's birthday month.

Mix, Match & Reorder to Suit Your Needs

So, there you have it. Not all to-do lists need to be a mile long. The point is, where possible, divide your financial goals so that you feel like you're making progress during the entire year versus a mad dash to accomplish everything this month.

Feel free to mix, match and reorder these tips to best suit your family's needs. If you're like me, while working on this, I decided to increase my retirement contribution by 1% now versus waiting longer into the year.

Ultimately, what matters most is that you're working toward tackling your financial goals and setting yourself up for long-term success. A month-to-month to-do list could be the best way to keep yourself on track.

(Note: While we hope this information is useful, it's only intended to provide general education. It's not legal, tax, or investment advice, and may not apply or be useful to your specific financial situation.)

Hank Coleman contributed to the reporting of this article.

Source : https://ca.finance.yahoo.com/news/month-month-guide-accomplishing-2017-113000788.html

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